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31 January forecast

Forecast updated 5:00pm EST - 31 Jan 2011

A series of two winter precipitation events will move across the state of Indiana during the next two days.
A zone of sharp temperature contrast aloft will lay across the state, mainly the central portion of Indiana.
The regions under the warmer air aloft should expect to receive freezing rain and sleet throughout the period,
while regions to the north of this zone should expect to see mainly snow.  We expect a sharp transition zone
between the snow and freezing rain/sleet to be found somewhere between Lafayette and Indianapolis,
this transition zone is likely to oscillate north and south during the two-day period, perhaps reaching into Tippecanoe County
for a substantial period of time.  Given that this sharp temperature contrast is expected and the uncertainty in
the predicted storm track, it is still difficult to predict precisely where this snow/freezing rain transition will occur.
The map below shows our forecast as of Monday afternoon. 

The first area of precipitation should move across the state during the next 12 hours and could produce up to 4-6" of snow
across north-central Indiana.  The second area of precipitation is associated with a major developing surface cyclone
that should produce ~6 hours of intense precipitation around midnight Wednesday morning, with heavy snow, sleet, and freezing
rain expected as one moves north-to-south across the state.  Blizzard conditions  are possible at times with winds approaching 35 mph
and visibilities near zero during this portion of the storm.  Blowing snow and drifting conditions should also be expected.

Travel will likely be extremely dangerous during this storm, and many roads may be impassible, especially with the blowing and 
drifting snow.  The Indianapolis metro area and surrounding areas could potentially receive 1"+ of ice, widespread power outages
and dangerous road conditions can be expected in the region highlighted in red below.

For official forecast information, check the National Weather Service in your local area.


today's short-range forecast graphic was produced by Mike Baldwin

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